APRU Population Aging Program Migrates to Keio University

APRU Population Aging Program Migrates to Keio University

January 15, 2018

Hong Kong SAR, January 5—APRU’s Population Aging Program has moved to Keio University in Tokyo, Japan, entering the next phase of its growth.

The move to Keio places the Program in the Asia-Pacific economy most renowned for a rapidly aging population.

In a recent letter to university presidents, Christopher Tremewan, APRU Secretary General, expressed his confidence in Keio to continue growing the Population Aging network’s strength and impact through the leadership and expertise of Hideyuki Okano, Professor and Dean of the Graduate School of Medicine, and Hiroki Nakatani, Project Professor of the Global Research Institute at Keio University.

Keio University is also home to both the Center for Supercentenarian Medical Research and the recently established Research Center for Financial Gerontology. These centers link research in medicine, economics, and engineering in its mission to address the challenges posed by an aging population.

Previously, the APRU Population Aging Program has been hosted at UNSW Sydney for three years under the leadership of John Piggott, Director of the ARC Centre for Excellence in Population Aging Research (CEPAR) where it developed the foundations for its strong network of renowned experts.

The Program notably worked with APEC and the Australian government, producing a policy paper, “The impact of demographic change on labour supply and economic growth: Can APEC meet the challenges ahead?”, briefing on the effects of population aging.

Looking to 2018 and beyond, Dr. Tremewan added, “Keio University’s support for transdisciplinary, internationally-oriented research and education will enable this APRU Program to continue growing its activities to address a key regional challenge.”

For more information about CEPAR, please click here.
For more information about the Research Center for Financial Gerontology, please click here.
For more information about the Center for Supercentenarian Medical Research, please click here

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